What is a Dental Hygienist

Dental hygienists are professionals who help evaluate a dental patient’s oral health. They can also make recommendations to help protect and promote good oral hygiene. They are the first line of defense against many of the most common dental diseases such as gingivitis or other types of gum disease. Dental hygienists can help dental patients develop better dental habits which can, in turn, help protect their teeth and allow them to keep their natural teeth for a longer time. Dental hygienists almost always work in a dental office but they are not dentists. Dental hygienists are somewhat similar in the dental world to nurses in the medical world, meaning they don’t require the same level of education as dentists but provide invaluable support to them.

EDUCATIONAL AND LICENSING REQUIREMENTS

Dental hygienists generally need an Associate’s Degree in dental hygiene. Unlike most Associate’s Degree programs, however, those for dental hygienists generally take three years to complete rather than two. Dental hygienists also need to be licensed by the state. While specific licensing requirements will vary from state to state, they generally require both clinical and written examinations as well as a degree from an accredited institution. In many cases, dental hygienists may also be required to have CPR certification.

SALARY

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the median income for dental hygienists was just under $75,000 a year or around $36 an hour.

JOB GROWTH

The demand for dental hygienists is expected to increase by 11% between 2018 and 2028, which is significantly faster than most occupations. This is largely due to two factors. The first is that as research shows a stronger and stronger link between good oral health and good overall health, more people are becoming aware of the importance of maintaining good oral health. This creates an increased demand for dental hygienists.

The second reason for the expected growth is due to the aging population of baby boomers. While people of all ages are becoming more aware of the importance of dental hygiene and its impact on overall health, as people age they become even more keenly aware of the need to care for their teeth if they want to keep them. Baby boomers represent one of the largest populations of the last century and as they head into their golden years they also represent one of the largest populations in need of services like dental hygienists.

What is The Most Popular Christmas Tree in the Northwest?

When selecting Christmas trees in the Pacific Northwest, a partridge in a fir tree could easily be the adapted words of “The 12 Days of Christmas” song. According to both the Pacific Northwest Christmas Tree Association and Northwest Arbor-Culture, Inc., fir trees are among the most popular grown and purchased Christmas trees.

Here are the top five Christmas trees.

Douglas Fir

Many purchases a natural tree for the smell, and the Douglas Fir tree does not disappoint. Its sweet fragrance and the bluish-green color of its soft needles make it a favorite of many.

Noble Fir

Its stiff sturdy branches can hold the heaviest of ornaments. This long-lasting tree is also used for Christmas wreaths and other outdoor decors.

Grand Fir

The Grand Fir gets its name because it can grow up to 300 feet. Its branches are also unique because both the upper and lower parts are visible which makes it even more fun to decorate.

Fraser Fir

Besides its aromatic scent, the needles of the Fraser Fir do not fall out as much as other evergreen trees which means fewer needles tracked around the house (and less clean up). Do not confuse the spelling or name with the Pacific Northwest’s favorite fictional television psychiatrist and radio personality, Dr. Frasier Crane.

Scotch Pine

There’s one in every crowd that goes against the grain, and in this case, that is the Scotch Pine which is the only non-fir tree in the top five. It has the benefits of the top firs including dense and bushy needles that are between one and three inches long, a wonderful scent, and needles that tend not to drop.

Regardless of the tree, you select, the best way to extend its life is to water it consistently and not to let the trunk exposed to air for longer than three to six hours after cutting. Visit Klopeman U-Cut Christmas Tree Farms in Washougal to find your perfect tree this Christmas season.